防災世界子ども会議(NDYS)

NDYS in Action, Newsletter 
Natural Disaster Youth Summit Monthly News     
                 http://ndys.jearn.jp/news/index.html  ndys@jearn.jp

Editor: Daniel Paz, 
Salta, Argentina

NDYS Youth Editors

Topics

Disaster Reduction and Climate Change

Indonesia is evaluating its level of organization.

    

Hospitals and health centers collapse when a disaster occurs and people have to wait for a long time to be assisted. Volunteers and doctors also suffer looses and this is worse.

Since 2004 Indonesia suffered more than 700 different emergencies and natural disasters that killed at least 250,000 people and 4 million displaced. But along with the houses and bridges washed away by the massive swell, more than half the 240 hospitals and health facilities were destroyed or badly damaged and 700 of the province’s 9,800 health workers dead or missing, according to the World Health Organization (WHO) in Indonesia. More than 20,000 patients had to wait up to 10 days before being admitted to a hospital. “These damaged facilities lost their capacity to protect and cater to the needy during those emergency periods as health facilities and health professionals too became victims of the disaster,” said Subhash Salunke, country representative for the world health body in Indonesia, at a seminar in Jakarta on making hospitals safe in emergencies, the global theme of 2009 World Health Day on 7 April.

The vulnerability of Indonesia, which sits on the boundaries of four moving tectonic plates and the “ring of fire” with 126 active volcanoes, to natural disasters makes this global campaign all the more urgent. “On average, Indonesia has five earthquakes a day measuring above five on the Richter scale,” Lucky Tjahjono, head of the Ministry of Health’s Emergency Preparedness and Response Unit, told the seminar.

To address the problem, the WHO campaign is advocating a series of best practices - such as using early warning systems and good site planning - to ensure the healthcare system is better prepared for emergencies.
There are low-cost solutions for ensuring structural integrity, so that health facilities do not collapse during earthquakes or cyclones, WHO Regional Director for Southeast Asia, Samlee Plianbangchang, said in a statement.  
He added that lifelines such as water and electricity must be backed up to ensure health facilities remain functional during disasters, and that the workforce should be trained to deal with emergencies and carry out contingency plans.
                                                                                                                          
Source: www.irinnews.org


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Editor: Daniel Paz, 
Salta, Argentina

Topics

Disaster Reduction and Climate Change

Agriculture is having hard times in Yemen.

An official has warned that delays in restoring the severely flood-affected agriculture sector in Hadhramaut Governorate, southeastern Yemen, will prompt farmers to abandon their jobs and seek work in other sectors, affecting food security in the impoverished country. “Agricultural infrastructure was severely damaged [in the floods] and many of our farmers are jobless now. We fear that this will lead to migration from agriculture to other sectors, which will create a serious problem,”  said Omar Muhaiwer, director of the Agriculture and Irrigation Office in Hadhramaut Valley.

The Agriculture suffered many times since floods started to be really considered in 2008. Now many farmers are suffering the bad effects of this disaster.

Calling for a quick revival of this sector, Muhaiwer said: “When you go to Seyoun you will find many people who used to work in agriculture now working as porters.” He added that because farm work is physically demanding, many young people are lured to other kinds of work.

           On 24 and 25 October 2008, rain fell on two million hectares of land for about 30 hours continuously, amounting to a total rainfall of some two billion cubic meters of water, said Muhaiwer. “The amount of water was twice the capacity of the waterways in the valley, causing flooding that destroyed the agricultural land and washed away the soil and crops,” he said.
             The floods killed 47 people and displaced 25,000 others, according to the government. The Ministry of Agriculture and Irrigation estimated the total damage to agriculture in the main valley area at more than 72 billion Yemeni Riyals (about US$360 million).
             Muhaiwer also warned that the green cover that was lost in the floods might lead to desertification. “We lost 25 percent of the palm trees in the valley, 30 percent of Ziziphus trees, which bees breed on, and 70 percent of Mesquite trees [which were partly blamed for
exacerbating the floods].”
             He said in summer, when temperatures rise and winds are stronger, less green cover would cause more sand to creep from the valley’s waterways towards the cities, leading to desertification in some areas and affecting agricultural production as well.
             In addition, less greenery may cause plant diseases and plant-harming pests. “Now we are witnessing a strange death of trees in Al-Hota area. Until now we don’t know why. We have to tackle new phenomena very quickly,” Muhaiwer sai
d.

Source: www.irinews.org

         
                                                                                                                                    

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Editor: Daniel Paz, 
Salta, Argentina

NDYS Youth Editors

Topics

Disaster Reduction and Climate Change

Burundi is affected by heavy rains.

Many people were displaced and being receiving assistance now. Buterere community was pounded by heavy rains

Rain-induced floods have displaced over 8,000 people in a commune north of Bujumbura, the Burundian capital, and damaged at least 1,200 houses as well as crops, an official has said.  "The rains have destroyed many houses and crops; others are still flooded," Moise Ndayisenga, the administrator of Buterere Commune, said. More rain fell on 12 April in Buterere - a low-lying area - but the displacement and damage caused has not been fully assessed because some locations are still inaccessible, the official said. At Maramvya, a settlement in Buterere, another downpour on 12 April displaced 450 households and destroyed at least 100 homes, he said, adding: "Half of Buterere Commune's population might become destitute."

 Flood waters had reached areas that were previously unaffected, "even moving down a road leading to Bujumbura International Airport,” Ndayisenga said.
Residents said the situation had been exacerbated by the absence of drainage channels. The nearby River Kinyankonge burst its banks, as it has in previous rainy seasons, causing more suffering to residents who have appealed for a bridge to be built over the river and for the digging of drains.

In efforts to prevent an outbreak of waterborne diseases such as cholera and dysentery, Red Cross officials have been spraying Buterere villages, where pit latrines have been destroyed by the flood waters.
            Government officials have also responded to the flooding in Buterere, with Immaculée Nahayo, minister for national solidarity, visiting the displaced and distributing maize flour, blankets and kitchen utensils.

Source: www.irinews.org

 

Comments: As you can see, now some countries are trying to decrease the catastrophic effects of disasters, but what would have happened if they had paid attention before?...

I wish people from Burundi were strong enough to resist the disaster. Hope they find quick solutions.

Many things are surrounding us, we have not to ignore them. Better late…

By Sergio Daniel Paz;  Salta-Argentina

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